Grumpy old fart!!!

"If you talk to God you're religious. If God talks to you, you're psychotic."

The Crippleage – Clacton on sea

 

The Crippleage – Clacton-on-Sea, Essex

February 7, 2021 Posted by | Deltiology, Social History, The Crippleage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Crippleage – Sekforde Street, London – 1921

February 7, 2021 Posted by | Deltiology, Social History, The Crippleage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

John Groom – The Terrace Homes – Clacton on Sea

February 7, 2021 Posted by | Deltiology, Social History, The Crippleage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

John Groom – 8 Sekforde Street, London

 

The Crippleage – 8 Seckforde Street, London – the postcard is a recent purchase and the other two images show a blue plague to John Groom and Seckforde Street today

January 31, 2021 Posted by | Deltiology, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Crippleage – Clacton-on-Sea, Essex

August 5, 2018 Posted by | Deltiology, Social History, The Crippleage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Crippleage

May 16, 2010 Posted by | Deltiology, Servants, Social History, The Crippleage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Crippleage

March 7, 2010 Posted by | Deltiology, Maid, Maids, Servants, Social History, The Crippleage | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Crippleage

John Alfred Groom was a London engraver and evangelical preacher, who became concerned with the plight of the poverty-stricken and often disabled girls and women who sold flowers and watercress in the streets around Farringdon Market. His work with them began when he founded the Watercress and Flower Girls’ Christian Mission in 1866. A permanent home for the mission was found in Harp Alley and Lord Shaftesbury became its first president. Religious services were held at Foresters’ Hall until its destruction in 1890, after which John Groom purchased Woodbridge Chapel, Clerkenwell.
Taking inspiration from the trend for imported handmade flowers, John Groom set up a factory in Sekforde Street, close to the Woodbridge Chapel, where disabled girls could work at making artificial flowers and thus make a living for themselves. The girls lived in houses in Sekforde Street, rented by John Groom. Further factories were subsequently built in Woodbridge Street and Haywards Place. The name of the charity was changed to John Groom’s Crippleage and Flower Girls Mission in 1907.

February 15, 2010 Posted by | Deltiology, Servants, Social History, The Crippleage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments